H-France Salon: Webinars

Originating in 2009, H-France Salon is an interactive journal that welcomes proposals which will enhance the scholarly study of French history and culture. The following webinars have been a part of the Salon. For instructions on how to participate in future webinars, click here.

 

H-France Salon, Volume 6, Issue 2

H-France Webinar: Environmental History: An Introduction
H-France's spring webinar occurred on 9 April 2014. It can be viewed here
Webinar Leader: Michael Bess, Vanderbilt University
Invited Participatns:
Sara B. Pritchard, Cornell University
David Blackbourn, Vanderbilt University
Webinar Moderator: Darrin McMahon, Florida State University.

 

 

H-France Salon, Volume 6, Issue 1

Webinar: Emotions in History, An Introduction.

H-France's fall webinar took place on 4 November 2013. It can be viewed here
Webinar Leader: William Reddy, Duke University
Invited Participants:
Barbara Rosenwein, Loyola University of Chicago
Thomas Dodman, Boston College
Piroska Nagy, Université du Québec à Montréal
Webinar Moderator and Organizer: Darrin McMahon, Florida State University
Note: The audio quality improves after about 1 minute.

 

H-France Salon, Volume 5, Issue 8

Webinar: "Writing the History of Empire: Past Approaches, New Perspectives."

H-France's spring webinar occurred on 18 April 2013.
It can be viewed here
Webinar Leader:  Eric Jennings, University of Toronto
Co-Participants:  Alice Conklin, The Ohio State University, and Laurent Dubois, Duke University.

Moderator:  Charles Walton, Yale University

Webinar Reading List:
Gregory Mann, "What was the Indigénat?  The Empire of Law in French West Africa"
Clifford Rosenberg, ""The International Politics of Vaccine Testing in Interwar Algiers,"
Alice Conklin, “Boundaries Unbound:  Teaching French History as Colonial History, and Colonial History as French History,”
The Chapter "Caribbean France" in Laurent Dubois' Soccer Empire: The World Cup and the Future of France

Eric Jennings

 

H-France Salon, Volume 4, Issue 5

The fall webinar took place on 4 October 2012.  It can now be viewed here 

Mack Holt, George Mason University, led the webinar. Charles Walton, Yale University, moderated.

Readings:
(1) Natalie Z. Davis, "The Rites of Violence: Religious Riot in Sixteenth-Century France, Past & Present 59 (1973): 51-91.

(2) Barbara B. Diefendorf, "Rites of Repair: Restoring Community in the French religious Wars," in G. Murdock, P. Roberts, and A. Spicer, eds., Ritual and Violence: Natalie Zemon Davis and Early Modern France (Oxford University Press, 2012), Past & Present Supplement no. 7, pp. 30-51.

(3) Penny Roberts, "Peace, Ritual, and Sexual Violence during the Religious Wars," in G. Murdock, P. Roberts, and A. Spicer, eds., Ritual and Violence: Natalie Zemon Davis and Early Modern France (Oxford University Press, 2012), Past & Present Supplement no. 7, pp. 75-99.

(4) Keith Luria, Sacred Boundaries: Religious Coexistence and Conflict in Early Modern France (Washington DC: Catholic University of America Press, 2005), pp. xiii-xxxviii and 1-46 (introduction and chap. 1).

Questions to consider while reading these materials:

1. Was it possible to purify a community of pollution without violence in sixteenth-century France? And if so, how?
2. Why did violence break out in some confessionally divided communities but not in others?
3. Once violence broke out in a community, what strategies worked best to de-escalate the violence, or even end it altogether?
4. Was religious toleration possible in early modern France? Or is the best that could be hoped for simply a non-violent, yet uneasy co-existence?
5. What roles did the monarchy, the rival churches, and local communities play in promoting confessional conflict or coexistence?

 

 

H-France Salon, Volume 3, Issue 2

H-France Webinar
"The Age of Revolutions in Global Context"
October 6, 2011

Guest Presenter:  Lynn Hunt, UCLA

Organizer and Moderator:  Charles Walton, Yale University
Edited by David Kammerling Smith, Eastern Illinois University

Video available HERE

Webinar Readings:
Lynn Hunt, "The French Revolution in Global Context," in David Armitage and Sanjay Subrahmanyam (eds.), The Age of Revolutions in Global Context, c. 1760-1840 (New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2009).
Suzanne Desan, "Transatlantic Spaces of Revolution: The French Revolution, Sciotomanie, and American Lands," Journal of Early Modern History 12 (2008), pp. 467-505.
William Max Nelson, "Making Men: Enlightenment Ideas of Racial Engineering," American Historical Review 115 (December 2010): 1364-1394.